Teens, Their Mobile Devices and Why the Combination Concerns Parents

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When it comes to teenagers and their devices, they are connecting, communicating and coming together with each other and society in general through their phones more than they do in person:

  • Ninety-two percent of teens are online at least once a day, and 75% have or have access to a smartphone. Ninety-one percent of teens go online from a mobile device.
  • Teens ages 12 to 17 spend an average of nine hours a day using their devices to text, post, listen to music and watch videos.
  • Fifty-three percent of teens report occupying a vehicle with someone who is texting and driving.
  • Fifty percent of teens using mobile devices think they are addicted to them. Fifty-nine percent of their parents asked in the same poll agreed.

The world is mobile in every sense of the world: new inventions move us forward and new technology makes it possible to multitask in motion. Teens are savvy when it comes to new devices and they want the best and latest, when the release date for new phones arrives, expect those devices and their accessories on top their most-wanted gifts list.

How are our kids using their phones?

Apps: Because so many apps are free, many parents have no idea how many their teenagers use. And there are difficult-to-find apps, called “ghost apps;” hidden behind innocuous icons and innocently duplicated real app icons. Teens use these ghost apps to hide sexting and explicit photos.

Games: Think teens are gearing up with expensive gaming consoles for their Call of Duty or Assassin’s Creed? Think again. Mobile devices account for 39% of game usage, and 93% of teens play some form of video games. And while parents express concern over game content, more than half enjoy the social element of gaming with their teens.

Dating and hook-ups: Too young for bars and mostly without cars, teens no longer eye each other over the biology lab Bunsen burner or pass notes in calculus class. They use dating and hook-up sites for everything from group conversation and meetups to flirting to casual sex between classes.

Ordinary chitchat: Instead of going to a friend’s house or the mall and meeting up in person, kids text with each other for conversation.

Posting photos and videos: Teens share what they wear, eat, buy, drive and earn to elicit responses, provoke shock, gain approval, court disapproval and prove their worth to their peers. Some teens lack of emotional and intellectual maturity also leads them to post images they find funny or intend as a joke but are hurtful to others.

Sexting, cyberbullying and stalking: The anonymity of the Internet allows the schoolyard bully to leave the playground and intimidate anyone, anywhere and anytime. Turning off mobile devices or changing passwords is only a temporary option since many teens need their devices to stay in touch with family, teachers and school administrators.

Body image comparisons: Particularly prevalent among teen girls, they snap selfies and share them to help “improve” their looks by encouraging each other’s drastic weight loss through starvation dieting, questionable plastic surgery procedures and excessively tight fitted corsets and undergarments.

Secret-sharing: Remember the adage, “Don’t tell anyone; it’s a secret?” Teens love these sites, where they read the darkest desires and confessions of total strangers and are encouraged to share their own thoughts anonymously.

What do parents need to know?

It’s a distracted world out there: Nearly 10% of teens age 15 to 19 die in distracted driving crashes, and nearly a half-million people have injured annually in distracted-driving incidents. Teens respect and mimic parental action, and need to see their parents obey the no-texting-while-driving rule, regardless of your state’s laws. Distracted driving is deadly driving, and no text, photo or game download is worth a life.

Phone use decreases face time: The devices also decrease a teen’s social skills development, interferes with good sleep habits and family interaction. With trust-worthy parental controls, Parents monitor teens’ device time with different features, turning their access on and off or blocking and unblocking particular apps to give them more digital downtime so that they can focus on schoolwork, hobbies and to develop personal relationships.

Teens overshare without understanding the consequences: Anonymity works both ways: it protects the stalker, pornographer, bully or thief, and your teens think they’re safe because their name isn’t used on a site. This false feeling of safety leads them to provide too much information, photos, and videos or use sites that capture their location or IP address. Explain to teens that any personal information shared is too much information, and even Snapchat postings are subject to grabbing and reposting.

It’s not always the stranger who’s the danger: Parents worry about the unknown bad guy in the van kidnapping their child, or sitting in the basement texting their teen about her body. But statistics show that over three million teens are bullied each year, one in six parents knows their child is either a victim or a bully and 160,000 skip school each day due to bullying. Parents need to balance the issue of strangers contacting their teens online and luring them with sex, money and jobs and the close-to-home issue of

Parents, remember that your teen is what you teach them to be: they learn kindness, charity, honesty, patience, courage, compassion and the priceless value of protecting their body, emotions, and intellect from anyone’s actions or words, whether spoken in person or sent online. Keeping in tune with what your teen is doing online and keeping the lines of communication open will lead them to a healthier life on and offline.

 

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